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Dating online > 30 years > Can a woman get tight again

Can a woman get tight again

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Skip navigation! Story from Sex School. Averbuch says. The relaxation of muscles can make the vagina more or less accommodating.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Tightening Methods For Women - Victoria Victoria

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Kegel Exercises Beginners Workout For Women

Vaginal Laxity and Childbirth: Is a “Loose Vagina” Common? Treatable?

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Following childbirth new mothers can feel distressed about the changes they see in their bodies. The majority of these changes go away naturally, but some changes can persist.

With the help of our Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist Katie , in this article I hope to give you a better understanding of vaginal laxity following childbirth: its prevalence, causes, risk factors, and of course treatment options — including what you can do on your own to address vaginal laxity click here to skip ahead. For some women the answer appears to be yes.

Vaginal delivery can result in persistent feelings of vaginal laxity. This laxity can reduce vaginal sensation during intercourse and diminish sexual satisfaction of both partners, which can in turn lead to decreased sexual self-esteem and a drop in sexual intimacy.

Vaginal looseness is a subjective and self-reported sexual health concern. There are no objective measures of it, and so there are few good statistics on the prevalence of vaginal laxity following vaginal childbirth. When it is investigated, vaginal laxity is typically lumped in with other female sexual dysfunctions. The main complaints included insufficient lubrication, abnormal vaginal sensation, vaginal laxity, vaginal tightness, pain with intercourse and incontinence during intercourse.

An earlier but perhaps less reliable survey of 25 to year-old women with at least one vaginal birth, reported that approximately half of women expressed concern over vaginal looseness ref 2. It has also been reported to be the most common physical concern discussed with OBGYNs after vaginal childbirth ref 3. So vaginal looseness appears to be a rather common complaint, or at the very least, a meaningful concern for many women following vaginal birth.

The walls of the vagina contain an elastic muscle that is normally folded up, holding the vagina closed tightly. During sexual arousal and childbirth hormones cause the muscle to relax. The vagina is designed to be able to relax and re-tighten repeatedly, without any loss of tone or tissue elasticity. Accordingly, regular sexual activity does not loosen the vagina.

But there are limits to the elasticity of this muscle and associated tissues, and a few risk factors are known to contribute to chronic feelings of vaginal looseness. So in broad terms, a young mother with an uncomplicated vaginal delivery will usually fully recover vaginal tightness within the first 6 months of having her first child.

Whereas women having children later in life, having multiple vaginal births, or having more significant injury during childbirth, are at a greater risk of experiencing chronic vaginal laxity that lasts beyond the first months.

Vaginal looseness is a condition that is distinct from vaginal prolapse, but can sometimes be confused with it. With vaginal laxity the vaginal tissue becomes loose or relaxed, and this is associated with feelings of reduced tightness.

In contrast, with vaginal prolapse, displacement of pelvic organs such as the bladder, rectum, urethra or small bowel pushes on the walls of the vagina causing it to leave its normal position. Even without looking at the clinical evidence, it seems like a good bet to assume that pelvic floor physiotherapy in the form of exercise therapy could help with vaginal looseness.

Pelvic floor physiotherapy is a highly recommended non-invasive treatment for a wide variety of pelvic issues including incontinence, pelvic prolapse and pelvic pain. There is also a large body of literature supporting the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatments for a wide range of other musculoskeletal injuries, atrophies and deficiencies.

So we might expect it to help with vaginal laxity as well. Indeed, it is common practice in the medical community to use targeted pelvic physiotherapy interventions, specifically pelvic exercise therapy like Kegel exercises, to help reduce feelings of vaginal laxity. These exercises are not intended to tighten the muscles of the vagina directly, instead, they may be used to help strengthen and tighten the pelvic floor muscles that surround the vagina.

This in turn may increase feelings of vaginal tightness both at rest and when the woman voluntarily contracts her pelvic floor muscles. Click here to skip ahead. It has also been suggested by clinical researchers that good pelvic floor muscle tone, strength and the ability to effectively contract these muscles, can improve vaginal sensations during intercourse including feelings of tightness, orgasmic response and the pleasure of both partners refs 4,5,6.

More research is needed. So, although pelvic floor muscle strengthening exercises to treat vaginal looseness makes good sense physiologically, is often recommended, and is supported by anecdotal evidence, clinical research evidence has been slow to accumulate. As mentioned, there is not a large body of research in this field yet, however, the clinical studies that have been done are beginning to show promising results that pelvic floor physiotherapy can indeed help vaginal looseness.

One such study published this year directly asked this question in first-time mothers — would pelvic floor physiotherapy help with symptoms of sexual dysfunction following childbirth ref 9. In this study the researchers evaluated first time mothers and gave them either pelvic floor physiotherapy or no treatment, between 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum, and then examined the differences in sexual function between the two groups.

This is not surprising nor discouraging for the potential benefit of pelvic floor physiotherapy, as negative results are common in clinical trials of physiotherapy treatments. Sample sizes are often too small to show statistical differences when only a small percentage of study participants should be expected to have a condition that might benefit from physiotherapy. In other words, any positive effects experienced by the small sub group of patients that might benefit from the therapy is lost in the crowd.

Pelvic floor physiotherapy is also not intended as a cure-all for all forms of sexual dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction is a hard subject to study. Therefore, in new mothers with a risk factor for vaginal looseness see risk factor 3 above , pelvic floor physiotherapy appears to help. Overall, the best evidence suggests that pelvic floor physiotherapy helps encourage healthy pelvic floor muscle function and can thereby decrease feelings of vaginal looseness resulting from childbirth.

These and other surgical approaches can be very effective at increasing vaginal tightness in patients. However, surgery is invasive, and has associated risks including the potential for nerve damage and loss of vaginal sensitivity.

Surgical approaches are typically only recommended for patients with vaginal laxity that appears unresponsive to pelvic physiotherapy. If you are considering surgery, please discuss your candidacy and your options with your family doctor. There does not appear to be any creams, pills or ointments with actual clinical data to back up their claims of improving vaginal tightness. The claims made on such bottles often have no clinical data to support them.

Nor are there any compelling reasons to believe that these products would work, especially as a long term solution for vaginal laxity.

Some of these products may also pose a safety concern, causing vaginal irritation, infection, and allergic reaction. In general, I would say that these products should be avoided.

If you feel compelled by the claims made by the manufacturers of these products, please discuss them with your family doctor before trying them out. Another product on the market directed towards vaginal tightening is radiofreqency thermal therapy.

This is basically a device that can warm the vaginal tissue without burning the surface of the skin. The idea behind this product is that local heating of the tissue will stimulate collagen formation in the vaginal tissue and thereby re-tighten the tissue at the opening of the vagina.

The commercial leader in this space appears to be the Geneveve product by Viveve. There have been a very small handful of studies published on this type of therapy, and nothing before All of these studies were designed without a proper control group, and used subjective patient reported measures for vaginal tightening and sexual satisfaction as the exclusive outcome measure.

So the studies published to date are basically only usable to show the safety of radiofrequency thermal therapy rather than the efficacy of it. Uncontrolled studies with subjective outcome measures such as these can suffer enormously from the placebo effect, and in most instances are entirely unreliable when it comes to determining how well a therapy actually works.

In other words, there is currently NO clinical data supporting the proposed benefits of radiofrequency thermal therapy for vaginal laxity whatsoever. Forget about creams and pills! The only clinically validated non-invasive treatment for vaginal laxity is pelvic floor strengthening. Pelvic floor strengthening can be accomplished on your own with a little effort and practice.

Kegel exercises are a well-known example of a pelvic floor exercise, and one that is well suited to this task. The first and possibly most difficult step is to identify the correct muscles in your pelvis to strengthen.

The best description I have heard for finding these muscles is to try to stop urinating mid-stream. When you perform a Kegel correctly it should feel like the area spanning from your pelvic bone to your tailbone contracts and lifts upwards and inwards, and not just the area towards the front or back.

Do not contract your buttocks or abdominals, or hold your breath while performing a Kegel. These are very common compensations for a weak pelvic floor that are not functionally equivalent, and they will hinder your development of pelvic floor strength and endurance. For some women finding these muscles and learning to consciously contract them can be very challenging.

This is particularly true for women with low muscle tone, women that have sustained muscle injury in the area which may reduce the tone and contractility of the affected muscles and women with reduced pelvic floor sensation — all of which can be common in mothers. Finding the muscles and learning to contract them can also be difficult for women who previously learned to do Kegels the wrong way.

Intravaginal Kegel devices see below can be a very effective tool for encouraging proper form. You could also consider asking for a bit of help. A pelvic physiotherapist can help you quickly identify and learn to contract the correct muscles.

It can also be harmful if you regularly perform Kegels incorrectly , and they are not recommended for women with an over-active pelvic floor. A pelvic physiotherapist will ensure that kegels are appropriate for you, teach you to use the correct muscles, and ensure that you are contracting them at the correct amplitude strength of contraction.

They will teach you supportive breathing, help you progress your strengthening routine with time, and help you develop a maintenance program to keep your gains in the future. A pelvic physiotherapist has many tools at their disposal that can be recommended to their patients, based on their individual needs. Thankfully this can be quite quick and completely discrete. A simple isometric approach contracting and holding the contraction can be effective, but some women may want to include physical devices in their exercise routines, such as trying to hold vaginal cones inside their vagina more on this below.

As strengthening progresses, it can also be beneficial to practice pelvic floor muscle contractions in different positions and during different activities, to help train the muscles to provide support for various demands. This is something that varies a great deal between patients, based on the nature of their particular vaginal laxity, their ability to locate and contract the pelvic floor muscles correctly, the degree of weakness, and so on.

Again, the exercise guidance that a pelvic physiotherapist provides can vary significantly between individuals, but generally you can think of pelvic muscle strengthening programs as very similar to other endurance strengthening exercise programs.

As your pelvic floor muscles improve their strength and endurance, progressing your exercise program can offer additional improvements in vaginal tightness. Such progression could include training the muscles while you are in other positions, or with movement such as during transition from sitting to standing. To help you keep your hard-fought gains it is also important to develop a maintenance program. Performing Kegel exercise three times per week is typically enough to maintain gains, while not being too big of a commitment to stick with it.

One popular alternative to performing classic Kegel exercises is to use a intravaginal strengthening device. These devices take that to the next logical step: instead of isometrically contracting the muscles, try holding a weight in your vagina instead. This can make finding the correct muscles easier, and can also be a very effective training tool. There is a wide selection of products designed for this purpose, and although they are all pretty similar, some are better than others.

There are many different permutations of Kegel devices available, so look around to find the right product for you. Instead of simply holding a weight, this device measures your contractions as you squeeze it, offering feedback, guidance, and workout routines. Vaginal looseness can be a difficult topic to discuss, and so the frequency of this condition is likely to be under-reported clinically ref 3.

Despite this, accumulating evidence suggests that it is a common condition following vaginal childbirth. It could take more than 6 months to recover normal vaginal tightness and sensation.

Vaginal tightening: Simple ways to tighten your private parts

There are various causes of uncontrollable vaginal tightness, and they may vary from time to time, even in the same person. As such, women experiencing the problem should consult a profession gynecologist. Vaginal tightness and looseness might seem to be sensitive topics to discuss.

Vaginal tightening. Yes, it is uncomfortable and awkward to even say these words.

They say size counts, but, let's face it, it's not always a man's size that determines how his manhood holds up in lover's lane. There are a myriad of myths that surround a woman's Mount Pleasant, and while a man's measurement is often called into question, the size of the camp ground is another rumor that suggests how successful a stay the trip was. There exists a misconception surrounding vaginal tautness, with virgins being tighter and promiscuous women being looser, and we hope to dispel these rumors thanks to the help of Psychology Today , as well as input by sex therapist Dr. Ava Cadell , founder of LoveologyUniversity. The first thing to remember is that women, like men, come in different sizes.

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Following childbirth new mothers can feel distressed about the changes they see in their bodies. The majority of these changes go away naturally, but some changes can persist. With the help of our Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist Katie , in this article I hope to give you a better understanding of vaginal laxity following childbirth: its prevalence, causes, risk factors, and of course treatment options — including what you can do on your own to address vaginal laxity click here to skip ahead. For some women the answer appears to be yes. Vaginal delivery can result in persistent feelings of vaginal laxity. This laxity can reduce vaginal sensation during intercourse and diminish sexual satisfaction of both partners, which can in turn lead to decreased sexual self-esteem and a drop in sexual intimacy. Vaginal looseness is a subjective and self-reported sexual health concern. There are no objective measures of it, and so there are few good statistics on the prevalence of vaginal laxity following vaginal childbirth. When it is investigated, vaginal laxity is typically lumped in with other female sexual dysfunctions.

The five exercises that will make your vagina tighter

According to a survey of 5, people by Forktip. So we need to have a little chat about vaginal tightness. The idea that your vagina could get loose from sex was something I remember being worried about as a teenager. Either way, a lot of us grew up worrying about how slack our vaginas may or may not be. At all.

The vagina is a flexible organ that can undergo many types of stretching over a lifetime, from tampon insertion, to intercourse, to childbirth.

At times, a woman may notice her vagina feels tighter than usual. Sometimes, these changes may cause a vagina to feel tighter than normal. As a result, some women may think their vagina is too tight, particularly if they experience discomfort or pain during sexual penetration.

11 Things That Happen to Your Vagina After You Stop Having Sex, According to OB/GYNs

When it comes to the vagina, there are a lot of myths and misconceptions. Some people, for example, believe that vaginas can lose their elasticity and become loose forever. Your vagina is elastic.

There are a number of healthy benefits to having sex. Sign me up! Unlike their premenopausal counterparts, Dr. Zanotti says postmenopausal women have a higher chance of experiencing a more permanent loss of vaginal elasticity after a prolonged period without sex. Zanotti says. The good news is that there are plenty of personal lubricants you can use, in addition to gentle stimulation, that can help combat vaginal dryness.

Is Tighter Really Better?

From my experience working at Lioness , our product uses precision sensors to visualize orgasms —and yes, also see vaginal tightness. Especially the severely misinformed guy on the right…. When most people talk about tightness, they envision that the narrower the passageway, the more friction there would be between the vaginal walls and penis during sex. There are two things that are wrong with this notion. First, the intensity of the squeeze one feels during sex is not based on the width of the vagina, but the motion of the pelvic floor muscles surrounding the vagina see below. Notice that I did not say strong — focusing on only strengthening your pelvic floor muscles with kegels can be counterproductive in some cases. If you did eventually your arm would probably start to hurt, and you might have a hard time carrying objects or typing at your computer.

Jul 30, - a doctor explaining loose vagina to a woman These muscles relax slowly, which is why foreplay can be very important. After sex Trying a different sexual position can sometimes change how tight or loose the vagina feels.

By Siofra Brennan For Mailonline. When hitting the gym, your goal may be a pert bottom or toned abs, but many of us are neglecting a crucial area - the pelvic floor. Childbirth, the menopause and general ageing side-effects all weaken the muscles. The good news is that sex itself is great for tightening things up with an orgasm working the same vaginal muscles as kegel exercises. British wrestling champion, personal trainer and director of Right Path Fitness Keith McNiven has revealed how practicing just a few simple exercises can boost your sex life stock image.

What You Need To Know About Pelvic Floor Muscles

The reality: It doesn't snap back into place immediately after delivery. So what actually happens to a vagina after birth? Will it bleed? Will it hurt?

Is It Possible to Have a Loose Vagina?

After a significant dry spell , it is possible that the first time you have sex can feel like, well, the first time. Insertion may take a couple tries and the sensation can be intense or even painful. Though multiple vaginal births can lead to some stretching of the vaginal canal, no amount of sexual penetration is going to make you looser, Mary Jane Minkin, M. Any discomfort should subside after a couple times.

The elastic muscles of the vagina can stretch and return to their usual shape.

February 05, Tara Langdale. All this extra blood rushing around your system can cause your mucus membranes to increase too, and the vagina is no exception. Swelling is the result and when the vaginal walls swell, the birth canal will feel smaller. This is one of the main reasons you get tighter when pregnant, but there are more….

Can I Make My Vagina Tighter If I Stop Having Sex?

Это зашифрованный вирус, болван; ваше счастье, что вам не удалось его вскрыть. - Но… - Сделка отменяется! - крикнул Стратмор.  - Я не Северная Дакота. Нет никакой Северной Дакоты. Забудьте о ней! - Он отключил телефон и запихнул за ремень. Больше ему никто не помешает. В двенадцати тысячах миль от этого места Токуген Нуматака в полной растерянности застыл у окна своего кабинета.

Does Your Vagina Become Tighter If You Have Less Sex?

Она знала, что это. Как и то, что шахта лифта защищена усиленным бетоном. Сквозь клубящийся дым Сьюзан кое-как добралась до дверцы лифта, но тут же увидела, что индикатор вызова не горит. Она принялась нажимать кнопки безжизненной панели, затем, опустившись на колени, в отчаянии заколотила в дверь и тут же замерла.

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